Summer/Fall 2021 Course Descriptions

Art

ONCAM: There are no ART Classes that are meeting as ONCAM
HYBRID: Will be a combination of in-person and online content that will be determined by the instructor
SYNC: Is all online and meets during prescribed times/days
ASYNC: Is all online, but the content and meeting times are not set.

This is subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on each instructor's syllabi and discretions.

 

Summer Session 2021

ART 280: COLLABORATIVE RESISTANCE PRINTSHOP
William Estrada, T/TH, 11–11:50am + 2:00–4:15pm, CRNs: 23256 + 23257

The course will focus on the creation of embroidery enhanced prints within a social and political context to amplify the stories and concerns of historically marginalized groups, with specific attention given to Chicago neighborhoods. Using accessible printmaking techniques, sewing, textiles, and digital distribution students will potentially work with community organizations doing grassroots organizing to develop and distribute images to the public that support people movements. We will learn from the work of contemporary artists working in collaboration with people to challenge oppressive systems through healing and joy.

 

Fall 2021

ART 101: SIGNIFYING PRACTICES 
Iris Bernblum, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35839 + 35835
Sanaz Sohrabi, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 46639 + 46640

The purpose of this class is to prepare you to be an interesting, knowledgeable and productive artist citizen (culture maker) in the 21 century. This class will unleash your radical imagination and set you on a path forward as an artist. We will become a community of learners in which each of you will develop the knowledge, perspectives and skills that will support your unique artistic/culture making practices. You will work on evolving a personal writing style that will be useful as you develop yourself as an artist/citizen/intellectual—supporting your thinking/research/making as well as your ability to explain and promote your work. 

You will learn to talk about your art, write critically about art, and be able to professionally share your work as an artist. Each student is responsible for contributing to a stimulating and supportive learning atmosphere in every class. This is the class I wish I had as an undergrad Art Major. This will be your crash course in what it means to be an artist in the world today and will give you exposure to many approaches to contemporary art making through a series of quick turn around assignments throughout the semester. You are encouraged to create assignments that draw on your surroundings and re-think materials you have access to in your everyday life. No prior experience required. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 112: INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 5215, CRNs: 35837 + 35838
Instructor TBD, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 5215, CRNs: 35868 + 35867
Instructor TBD, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 5215, CRNs: 35870 + 35869
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, HYBRID - AEH 5215, CRNs: 39879 + 39525

Introduction to drawing: orientation to the description and expressive potential of drawing through exposure to a variety of subjects, media, and formal concepts. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 102. Field trips required at a nominal fee. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory. Creative Arts course.

 

ART 130: INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING + COLOR
Instructor TBD, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 4200, CRNs: 37541 + 35871
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 4200, CRNs: 39408 + 39406
Matthew Metzger, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 4200, CRNs: 38243 + 39916
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3–5:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 4200, CRNs: 40419 + 38247

Beginning painting: introduction to major directions of contemporary painting; underlying historical precedents; orientation to subjects and formal concepts using relevant materials and process. Course Information: Field Trip required at a nominal fee. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll for one Lecture and one Laboratory. Creative Arts course.

 

ART 140: INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 4100, CRNs: 35874 + 35873
Dan Peterman, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 4100, CRNs: 35876 + 35875
Faheem Majeed, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35878 + 35877
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, HYBRID - AEH 4100, CRNs: 40475 + 40474

This class is an introduction to sculptural practices. We will study and work with three-dimensional form and space as an investigation of the visual and material world in which we live—this involves looking at artifacts of everyday life as much as paying careful attention to contemporary and historic art and ideas. The course is divided into various projects and exercises. These projects include the re-articulation and transformation of familiar objects; the integration of different materials and methods to create a coherent, self-standing sculptural object; the observation and understanding of objects and how these alter and affect space (and our perception of space); and the relationship between material, form, process and content. The goal is to engage in a series of responses to material, formal and spatial exploration by means of experimentation and discovery. No prior experience required. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 150: INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA ARTS
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 35880 + 35879
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 35882 + 35881
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 35884 + 35883
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 42854 + 42853

This studio course introduces fundamental skills used to create interactive art, sound, light, and responsive environments, including circuit making & bending. Hands on exercises enable all students to explore and master the use of basic electronics components, sensors, and programming for interactive installation projects. In class lectures introduce students to the most innovative and provocative new media artists. No prior experience required. Laptop Required. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 151: CREATIVE CODING
Instructor TBD, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 42471 + 42470
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 43430 + 43431
Instructor TBD, F, 9:00am–3:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 43432 + 43433
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 44903 + 44905

Through this interdisciplinary course, students will learn the code-based tools used to shape raw data into interactive audio and visual projects. Students will investigate the ways in which social media, data, and code have been instrumental in reconfiguring the nature of social relationships in our society. This includes fundamental shifts in how we work, socialize, participate in culture, and interact with the spaces and communities around us. A close look will be taken at the evolution of visual strategies used to frame social data over the past decade. Surveyed topics include strategies of navigation through the new landscape of data-driven imagery - imagery intent on 'meaningfully' reflecting back on us who we are through our data. Readings and in-class discussions will delve into the ethical implications related to the use of data as a medium, and to methods of data collection, generation, curation, processing, dissemination, and use. Coding tools include Processing, HTML, Javascript, and Python. No prior programming experience required. Laptop Required. Class Schedule: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 160: PHOTOGRAPHY I
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 35886 + 35885
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35888 + 35887
Silvia Malagrino, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35890 + 35889
Instructor TBD, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 35892 + 35891
Instructor TBD, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 40418 + 40417
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 40579 + 40578

This course is an introduction to the study and practice of photography. Through this course you will learn the basics of digital photography, the basics of digital imaging and getting familiar with the history of art. The photographic image permeates every aspect of our culture. It has profoundly changed the way we understand the world around us. As we shall see “photography” encompasses a very broad spectrum of activities. But throughout all there are certain shared basic skills and fundamental elements. Through hard work and dedication in this course you will come to understand the fundamental concepts of “photographic seeing”and learn the basic skills to communicate photographically.Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 170: INTRODUCTION TO FILMMAKING
Instructor TBD, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 3204, CRNs: 35895 + 35893
Instructor TBD, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 3204, CRNs: 35898 + 35897
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 3204, CRNs: 35900 + 35899
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 3204, CRNs: 40477 + 40476

An integral part of the School of Art’s core curriculum, this course focuses on art that employs the dimension of time. We’ll look at work that broadens and challenges the definition of filmmaking. This is a project-oriented class, introducing students to basic video and audio production tools. Through a series of screenings, readings, discussions, field trips, and projects, we will sharpen the technical skills, powers of observation, and critical mindsets essential to thinking through film, television, sound art, performance, radio and other contemporary moving image and time-based mediums.  The goal of this course is to become more enthusiastic and skilled art makers through both making and watching and to answer the question “where do I fit into this wild world of moving images and what do I want to say about it?”

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 190: WORKSHOPS IN SOCIAL PRACTICE: PRISONS, POLICING, & COVID-19
Laurie Jo Reynolds, T/TH, 6:30–9:00pm, SYNC, CRNs: 38373 + 38378

This course provides an introduction to social practice, a genre of art that depends on inquiry, dialogue, participation, and action in projects with real people. Artists have used social practice to fill community needs, generate new social dynamics, bring attention to public space, interpret history, influence policy, provoke audiences, produce comedy, celebrate the uselessness of art, and more. Through artists dialogues, class experiments and interventions, we will explore and evaluate the ways that artists intervene in society and create structures of participation. Hands on workshops will allow students to explore their own areas of interest, working individually and in groups to design socially-engaged art projects. Students may explore any topic of their choice, but we will especially focus on local case studies in prison and policing.

  • No prior experience required. This is a synchronous Zoom video class.
  • Please contact ljr@uic.edu with questions.
  • To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.

 

ART 212: TOPICS IN DRAWING: DRAWING AND NOTHINGNESS
Nate Young, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 5215, CRNs: 42809 + 42808​

… there are flights of fantasy in the hold of the ship. The ordinary fugue and fugitive run of the language lab, black phonography’s brutally experimental venue. Paraontological totality is in the making. Present and unmade in presence, blackness is an instrument in the making. Quasi una fantasia in its paralegal swerve, its mad-worked braid, the imagination produces nothing but exsense in the hold.  … “The world was ever after/elsewhere,/no/way where we were/ was there.”  No way where we are is here.  Where we were, where we are, is what we meant by “mu,” which wilderson would rightly call “the void of our subjectivity.”  And so it is we remain in the hold, in the break, as if entering again and again the broken world, to trace the visionary company and join it.

What kinds of productive and progressive actions can come out of the void of subjectivity? In this course (drawing from Fred Moten’s seminal essay Blackness and Nothingness (Mysticism in the Flesh) ) students will create a body of work that addresses this question, instigated by a deep thinking about ideas around absence. Conventionally ideas about absence draw relationships to lack.  In this case we will attempt to think about the void as a space of ultimate potential.  Students will be expected to come up with their own ways of interpreting what the space of nothingness is.

 

ART 250: TOPICS IN NEW MEDIA: INTRODUCTION TO WEARABLES
Instructor TBD, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 42301 + 42302

This research based studio course will focus on wearable technology, electronic textiles, and soft computing. The history of wearables in contemporary culture and art from the earliest forms to present day will enhance understanding and ability to analyze the relationship of technology to the body, social interaction, and environment. Students will develop concepts into functional wearables through learning to integrate electronics and fiber art techniques using sensors, microcontrollers, and basic programming. No prior experience required. Laptop Required. 

  • For consent by Instructor, please contact Sabrina Raaf: sraaf1@uic.edu

 

ART 261: ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY
Colleen Keihm, M/W. 3:00–5:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 5202, CRNs: 35914 + 35913​

Analog Photography analyzes the initial driving forces of the medium: light and time. Throughout this course we will study studio lighting, camera exposure, and the physicality of the print. Students will have the opportunity to work with 35mm, medium format and large format cameras, experiment with studio lighting and learn to make digital and analog photography prints in the darkroom and digital lab. Visiting artists and class trips to local archives will be included in this lecture and lab course.

 

ART 270: TOPICS IN FILM:  DO-IT-YOURSELF (COLLECTIVES, HAPPENINGS AND INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION)
Eileen Mueller, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, HYBRID - AEH 3226, CRNs: 42064 + 42065

Together we will investigate how the urgency of our work can necessitate radical shifts in how we produce and screen moving images. An introduction to 16mm film, hand processing, and analog video technologies will be our jumping off point. Histories of intentional communities based in skill sharing and emergent punk philosophies will inform our practice throughout the semester. Visits with practitioners running mobile cinemas, microcinemas, and other alternative screening and production spaces will offer insights into how analog technologies gain increasing relevance in a digitally native world. The class will culminate in an alternative screening of the students’ own design.

 

ART 275: TOPICS IN SCREENWRITING: TALK, TEXT, TRACE
Jesse Malmed, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35922 + 35921

A project-based course introducing students to the intersections of the moving image and the written word. Drawing on a range of practices including narrative cinema, the essay film, concrete poetry, live cinema and translation, students will develop critical and creative approaches to reading, writing, seeing and hearing. In addition to expanding their visual storytelling abilities and contemplating new ways of combining writing and filmmaking, students will learn the basic principles of substance, structure and style and how to write in proper script format. 

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required.

 

ART 330: TOPICS IN PAINTING II
Matthew Metzger, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, HYBRID - AEH 4200, CRNs: 35928 + 35927

In-depth focus regarding a specific topic/emphasis under the direction of the instructor; direct experience and related readings investigate innovations and major directions in contemporary painting. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 332. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite(s): ART 230; and junior standing or above; or consent of instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 340: TOPICS IN SCULPTURE II
Dan Peterman, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 4100, CRNs: 35932 + 35931

Specific topics--designed by the instructor—address current practices and theories in sculpture and installation. The course is an investigation of sculptural practice as a vehicle by which to explore a variety of media. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 342. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 hours. Field trips required at a nominal fee. Prerequisite(s): ART 240; and junior standing or above; or consent of instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 350: 3D SPACE 1: MODELING
Sabrina Raaf, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 37253 + 37254​

This course will provide an introduction to 3D modeling techniques and applications in the arts, design, architecture, biovisualization, and computer science. Students will explore object modeling, environment construction (including set design), surface texturing, lighting, image rendering, and basic camera animation. Advanced lessons will focus on detailed surface mapping and fine-tuning topology. Through lectures, tutorials, and in-class projects, students will come to develop a multi-purpose skill set that may be used for innovative content creation such as for filmic animation and compositing, previsualization of designed objects and sculptural installations, and other cross-media explorations such as virtual worlds design and digital printing.

The 3D Space I class centers on modeling and still image output. 3D Space II - which is taught in the Spring semesters - serves as a continuation of 3D Space and introduces animation, dynamics (including particle and fluid systems), rigging, and scripting for generative systems.

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. 
  • For consent by Instructor, please contact Sabrina Raaf: sraaf1@uic.edu

 

ART 360: TOPICS IN PHOTO: BURDEN OF PROOF
Nathan Miller, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, HYBRID - AEH 5202, CRNs: 35934 + 35933​

This studio course concerns strategies for photography subjects that are without optical specificity--entities and places that have parameters which are not entirely framed by the physical markers but by the psychologically, experientially, culturally, or spiritually recognized characteristics. To what degree is it possible to photograph a life-changing experience, or cultural psychologies? What about a lie? God? Sound? These are examples of guiding questions that will be investigated through texts, discussions, analysis of related practices, assignments, and an 8-week project. The course defines photography as, “the recording of light”, and supports the students in acting out that definition through traditional and non-traditional processes.

 

ART 372: TOPICS IN VIDEO II: POP CULTURE(S)
Raphael Nash, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 3226, CRNs: 35942 + 35941

In this course, we will trace the consumption of cool across a history of visual mediums. Using advanced production tools, we will explore the relationship between the status quo, otherness, appropriation, and celebrity. Projects created in this course can extend into the mobile-specific, installation, and short film spaces.

 

ART 382: TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES
Tiffany Funk, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 3226, CRNs: 37255 + 37256

Thank you for being an artist. There is not one single way to be an artist. The professionalization of art is one reality that is useful to understand. While it is not the only path, this course will touch upon standard professional issues. We will discuss and study and learn from artists and curators (our guests) about how they arrived at their respective artistic platforms. We will also discuss methods for making a sustainable art practice achievable from a practical standpoint. We will touch upon several practical fundamentals that include: the artist’s statement; how to talk about and lecture about your work publicly (your midterm); how you might network and also create community; what are your short-term and long-term goals and how you keep them in mind as you encounter challenges (everyone encounters challenges); how do you make time when there is so much competing for your time (you have to be stubborn and disciplined); how do you define your goals? How do you use your organizational skills to find work? What professional digital presence do you have? These are methods that only you can put into practice. And the plan is to start to improve on these methods in this class.

 

ART 401: SENIOR THESIS
Silvia Malagrino, Nate Young, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 3226, CRN: 35953 + 35952​

Senior Projects and Critique is a production , discussion , and critique class for advanced art majors in Moving Image, New Media, Photography and Studio Art. It has been designed to establish an interdisciplinary , multidisciplinary, and critical dialogue regarding contemporary art/ work. This is a two-part course. The FALL semester leads to the production and presentation of a Thesis (ie, a quality body of work) to be completed in the Spring semester (via ART 402,) in partial fulfillment of requirements for the BFA Degree.

 

ART 457: EXPANDED CINEMA
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 6:30–9:00pm, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 35967 + 35966​

This advanced studio course examines the artistic opportunities provided by current and emerging media technologies. From video synthesis to virtual reality, artists have historically taken advantage of new imaging apparatuses to expand ways of seeing/hearing/experiencing. Between laptops, game consoles, video streaming services, mobile devices, and customer service kiosks, interactive moving image screens play an unprecedented and ever expanding role in everyday life. Course sessions will combine screenings, lectures, and discussions on expanded cinema practices along with workshops introducing media techniques, such as VR, AR, projection mapping, and body tracking. No prereqs or previous experience required. 

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. 
  • For consent by Instructor, please contact Sabrina Raaf: sraaf1@uic.edu

 

ART 460: ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHOTO: ANTHOTYPES
Beate Geissler, TH, 3:30–6:15pm, HYBRID - AEH 5202, CRNs: 45018 + 45019

This class is a collaboration between the Greenhouse and the Photography Department at UIC. We will explore photo-sensitive properties of plants and vegetables. We will use plants to make Photographs, so called Anthotypes, a process utilizing light sensitive plant juice. The goal is to plant our own materials, compost and invest in the photo-sensitive process, environmental studies and art making. Such alternative photographic processes are friendly to the environment, they demand slowness and the suspension of human time. We will foster awareness of our environment, our relationship to plants, water, soil, light and image making. The interaction with plants, the necessary care and the vital scientific questions behind the natural processes, like photosynthesis, encompass contemporary approaches to our world. We will pay attention to light as photography’s most important ingredient and light as energy producing source in plants. How do pigments absorb light energy, how is their light sensitivity and how is this related to printing and taking/making an image? Exploring the Anthotype process in this context seems a much needed response to - and reflection of the many problems related to climate change and will help students to understand visualities and their ideological impact in a very immediate and sustainable way.

Interdisciplinary Education in the Arts (IDEAS)

IDEA 110: CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION IN DESIGN AND THE ARTS
Hannah Higgins, M/W, 9:30–10:45am, HYBRID - AEH 3226, CRNs: 42473 + 42472

This course examines and develops projects of intermedia art (art that falls between and among several disciplines) as situated in emerging technologies.  Through a sequence of visits from practitioners in the arts, music, theater, film, architecture and interactive media, students will learn how studio media became intermedia, how the emerging study of the Anthropocene epoch is transforming the way nature and culture are understood as related topics, and the many uses and effects of the interdisciplinary arts around world. Graded projects mix making and writing both individually and in small work groups. No prerequisites.

This course will consist of recorded lectures and in person discussion on alternating days (half of the class each day for the semester).

 

IDEA 410: INTERDISCIPLINARY CAPSTONE FOR IDEA MAJORS
Tiffany Funk, T, 12:00–2:40pm, HYBRID - AEH 5215, CRN: 45336

This course is a sustained practicum in the production, discussion and theorization of work produced by seniors (in the last two semesters) of IDEA coursework. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Field work required.

WHY A CAPSTONE? The IDEAS Capstone Project is typically pursued in the final two semesters at UIC, building upon the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the undergraduate years. To this end, all IDEAS majors enroll in a two-semester, sustained practicum that focuses on the production, discussion and theorization of subjects encountered throughout coursework in the College of Art, Design and Architecture (CADA) and the larger community of UIC.

The Capstone may focus on a scholarly research or theory, creative visual or audio work, or design innovation or application. All projects develop professional skills, whether through rigorous inquiry, writing, crafting, or public presentation.

IDEAS Capstone Projects challenge students to work independently or as a member of a team, develop critical and analytical skills, take risks, and see themselves as part of a global network of creatives, makers, activists, and thinkers.

Art Education

ART 110: INTRODUCTION TO ART EDUCATION

Introduction to Art Education will introduce students to a range of practical and theoretical perspectives in art education through exploration of various practices and sites in Chicago, the U.S., and in global contexts. Course readings and assignments will be grounded in current debates and diverse examples of the ways in which art education engages context and builds community. We will ask how contemporary practices of art education challenge dominant narratives, foster personal and cultural connections, and create movements for social change. We will consider the complexities of working in collaboration and solidarity with people to address shared issues and concerns. We will become a community of learners in which each student will develop the knowledge, perspectives, and skills to understand and examine the role of the arts and education in democratic life.Course Information: Field trips required at a nominal fee. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 201: DEMOCRATIC PRACTICES IN ART EDUCATION
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 11:00am–1:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 42053 + 42052​

The purpose of this course is to prepare you to be an interesting, knowledgeable, inspired and inspiring artist/citizen/educator in the 21st century. Designed as an introduction to practical and theoretical perspectives in art education, this course explores the evolution of various practices and sites of art education in Chicago, the U.S. and in global contexts. The course will offer examples of how art education engages context and community; current forms, practices, and perspectives; personal and cultural connections; and critical social issues. We will consider ways in which art education for social justice involves working in collaboration and solidarity with people to address shared issues and concerns. We will become a community of learners in which each student will develop the knowledge, perspectives, and skills that will help you understand and examine the role of the arts and education in democratic life.

 

ART 310: VISUAL AND VERBAL LITERACY IN ART EDUCATION
Karyn Sandlos, M/W, 11:00am–1:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 43435 + 43436​

The purpose of this course is to prepare teacher candidates in the BFA in Art Education program to be knowledgeable, critical, and reflective practitioners of art education in the 21st C. Throughout the semester, we will explore methods of teaching art in relation to the theory and practice of visual and critical literacy. Prerequisite: ART 210. Online/Sync. Laptop required.

 

ART 410: ART EDUCATION PRACTICUM
Karyn Sandlos, T, 3:30–6:15pm, SYNC, CRNs: 43438 + 43439​

The purpose of this course is to provide teacher candidates with opportunities to analyze, teach and prepare plans for curriculum that are culturally responsive. The course will offer examples of how to engage social justice art making through personal and cultural connections that critically examine the role of art education. We will collaborate to build and sustain supportive learning environments that center solidarity with people and address shared issues and concerns. We will become a community of learners in which each student will develop the knowledge, perspectives, and skills that will help them become critical art educators as they prepare for student teaching.

  • Prerequisite: ART 210. Online/Sync. Laptop required.
Art: Graduate Level

ART 480: 3D SPACE 1: MODELING
Sabrina Raaf, M/W, 12:00–2:40am, HYBRID - AEH 5226, CRNs: 38061 + 38062

This course will provide an introduction to 3D modeling techniques and applications in the arts, design, architecture, biovisualization, and computer science. Students will explore object modeling, environment construction (including set design), surface texturing, lighting, image rendering, and basic camera animation. Advanced lessons will focus on detailed surface mapping and fine-tuning topology. Through lectures, tutorials, and in-class projects, students will come to develop a multi-purpose skill set that may be used for innovative content creation such as for filmic animation and compositing, previsualization of designed objects and sculptural installations, and other cross-media explorations such as virtual worlds design and digital printing.

The 3D Space I class centers on modeling and still image output. 3D Space II - which is taught in the Spring semesters - serves as a continuation of 3D Space and introduces animation, dynamics (including particle and fluid systems), rigging, and scripting for generative systems.

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. 
  • For consent by Instructor, please contact Sabrina Raaf: sraaf1@uic.edu

 

ART 520: GRADUATE SEMINAR: TEACHING ARTISTS: HISTORIES AND THEORIES OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE ARTS
John Neff, M, 3:00–5:40pm, HYBRID - TBD, CRNs: 35985 + 35984

This seminar-style course will examine the history and practice of advanced visual arts instruction from the early modern era to the present. The course will be divided into three sections: Models and Theories, Institutions and Roles, and Collaborations. After beginning with a survey of historical models of arts education – from the European academy system to 21st century international MFA programs – the course will move on to "case studies" of pedagogical practices in several contemporary graduate programs and museums before concluding with a series of site visits where students will engage directly with educators in their workplaces. The goal of the course is to equip studio MFA students with a toolbox of "professional practices" – with an emphasis on community-oriented and experimental approaches – that might inform their future work in the visual arts.

 

ART 520: GRADUATE SEMINAR: RADICAL ACTS: DOING JUSTICE TO THE ART RADICAL ACTS: DOING JUSTICE TO THE ART
Rashayla Marie Brown, F, 9:00–11:40am, HYBRID - AEH 3226, CRNs: 35986 + 35987​

What would happen if artists engaged with the praxis of entanglement, going beyond theory and into the existence of anti-oppression? What if we revolted against the myth of meritocracy, the privileged experts of our field were mothers and caretakers, multilingualism and humility were the price of entry, and our research centered a curious body-mind?

This course will experiment with actions of collaboration, ethics, negotiation, empathy, decoloniality, and solidarity from a variety of sources within and outside the “art world.” You will learn to question common tropes of viewership and egocentrism within visual art, putting real-time, current events into dialogue with readings and workshops.

 

ART 530: ADVANCED GRADUATE CRITIQUE
Beate Geissler, Date and Time: Arranged, CRNs: 36027 + 35988
Dianna Frid, Date and Time: Arranged, CRNs: 36027 + 35988
Susy Bielak, Date and Time: Arranged, CRNs: 36027 + 35988

Individualized graduate study; creative projects and research by each student through consultive agreement with graduate faculty committee. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 530. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of the School graduate faculty committee. Class Schedule Information: To be registered properly, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Conference.

 

ART 541: PRISON AESTHETICS AND POLICY
Laurie Jo Reynolds, W, 6:30–9:00pm, SYNC, CRN: 46030

This course takes aesthetic and political approaches to study the Illinois carceral landscape. Through theoretical readings, engaged research, and participatory interviews, we will consider the daily lives of people under the most extreme forms of carceral control. This consideration includes sensory experiences, movements, schedules, visibility, stigma, and sense of time passing. We will learn about the structure of the prison administration: the paramilitary structure, the bureaucracy, and the prison labor dynamic. We will examine the social and political relations between the Department of Corrections, legislators, advocates, family members, and prisoners, and the systems of classification and identification used by each. We will discover how these factors construct public understandings of the carceral state, and how that bears on public policy. The final project will include a class monitoring report for public view. No prerequisites required. This interdisciplinary course is designed for students of public policy, sociology, social work, political science, criminology, architecture and art.  

  • No prior experience required.
  • This is a synchronous Zoom video class. It requires working video and audio. 
  • Please contact ljr@uic.edu with questions.
Art History

Visit the Art History website for available courses: https://arthistory.uic.edu/courses/current-course-flyers/

Museum & Exhibition Studies

View available MUSE courses here: https://artandarthistory.uic.edu/muse/courses