Spring 2021 Course Descriptions

Art

On-campus instruction (ONCAM) will run as hybrid courses. Students will attend in-person courses with half of class coming on designated days and the others participating in asynchronously/synchronously (ASYNC/SYNC) education. This will rotate to capture all students enrolled in the class. These will be clearly communicated to the students by the professor on or before the first course session. On campus sessions will be in smaller groups, and are principally meant to accommodate more technical, equipment dependent course content. It will also be subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on the instructors syllabi and instructors' discretions.

 

ART 101: SIGNIFYING PRACTICES 
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 36324 + 36325

Introduction to theoretical perspectives for analyzing experiences of visual and multi-modal phenomena. Strategies for researching and writing about topics related to contemporary aesthetic practices. Course Information: Fields trips required at a nominal fee. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 112: INTRODUCTION TO DRAWING
Nate Young, M/W, 12:00-2:40pm, ONCAM AEH 5215, CRNs: 35216 + 35215
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM AEH 5215, CRNs: 35218 + 35217
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, ONCAM AEH 5215, CRNs: 38659 + 38658

Introduction to drawing: orientation to the description and expressive potential of drawing through exposure to a variety of subjects, media, and formal concepts. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 102. Field trips required at a nominal fee. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory. Creative Arts course.

 

ART 130: INTRODUCTION TO PAINTING + COLOR
Instructor TBD, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM AEH 4200, CRNs: 35220 + 35219
Instructor TBD, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, ONCAM AEH 4200, CRNs: 38628 + 38627
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM AEH 4200, CRNs: 39302 + 39303
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm. ONCAM AEH 4200, CRNs: 40688 + 40687

Beginning painting: introduction to major directions of contemporary painting; underlying historical precedents; orientation to subjects and formal concepts using relevant materials and process. Course Information: Field Trip required at a nominal fee. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll for one Lecture and one Laboratory. Creative Arts course.

 

ART 140: INTRODUCTION TO SCULPTURE
Mancini, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, ONCAM AEH 4100, CRNs: 35222 + 35221
Faheem Majeed, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM AEH 4100, CRNs: 35833 + 35832
Instructor TBD, M/W 12:00–2:40pm, ONCAM AEH 4100, CRNs: 39296 + 39297
Instructor TBD, T/TH 12:00–2:40pm, ONCAM AEH 4100, CRNs: 39299 + 39298

The study of major directions and underlying historical precedents in contemporary sculpture. Orientation to concepts of 3-dimensionality through use of relevant processes and heuristic approaches to making. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 140. Field trips required at a nominal fee. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory. Creative Arts course.

 

ART 150: INTRODUCTION TO NEW MEDIA ARTS
Sara Condo, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 35836 + 35835
Sara Condo, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 39300 + 39301
Instructor TBD, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 40748 + 40747

This studio course introduces fundamental skills used to create interactive art, sound, light, and responsive environments, including circuit making & bending. Hands on exercises enable all students to explore and master the use of basic electronics components, sensors, and programming for interactive installation projects. In class lectures introduce students to the most innovative and provocative new media artists. 

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. 

  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 151: CREATIVE CODING
Instructor TBD, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 41862 + 41863
Instructor TBD, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 43486 + 43485
Jared Kelly, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs 42792 + 42793

Through this interdisciplinary course, students will learn the code-based tools used to shape raw data into interactive audio and visual projects. Students will investigate the ways in which social media, data, and code have been instrumental in reconfiguring the nature of social relationships in our society. This includes fundamental shifts in how we work, socialize, participate in culture, and interact with the spaces and communities around us. A close look will be taken at the evolution of visual strategies used to frame social data over the past decade. Surveyed topics include strategies of navigation through the new landscape of data-driven imagery - imagery intent on 'meaningfully' reflecting back on us who we are through our data. Readings and in-class discussions will delve into the ethical implications related to the use of data as a medium, and to methods of data collection, generation, curation, processing, dissemination, and use. Coding tools include Processing, HTML, JavaScript, and Python. 

  • No prior programming experience required. Laptop Required.

  • Class Schedule: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 160: PHOTOGRAPHY I
Nathan Miller, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 35226 + 35225
Julian Vandermoore, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35839 + 35838

Zuri Washington, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 36809 + 36810
Shir Ende, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 39304 + 39305
Silvia Malagrino, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 39306 + 39307
Silvia Malagrino, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, SYNC, CRNs: 39051 + 39050
Eileen Muller, F, 9:00am–3:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 42185 + 42184

This course is an introduction to the study and practice of photography. Through this course you will learn the basics of digital photography, the basics of digital imaging and getting familiar with the history of art. The photographic image permeates every aspect of our culture. It has profoundly changed the way we understand the world around us. As we shall see “photography” encompasses a very broad spectrum of activities. But throughout all there are certain shared basic skills and fundamental elements. Through hard work and dedication in this course you will come to understand the fundamental concepts of “photographic seeing”and learn the basic skills to communicate photographically.

  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 170: INTRODUCTION TO FILMMAKING
Asya Dubrovina, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM, CRNs: 35228 + 35227
Austin McCann, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35843 + 35841
Chris Olsen, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 38527 + 38528
Fox, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM, CRNs: 39308 + 39309

An integral part of the School of Art’s core curriculum, this course focuses on art that employs the dimension of time. We’ll look at work that broadens and challenges the definition of filmmaking. This is a project-oriented class, introducing students to basic video and audio production tools. Through a series of screenings, readings, discussions, field trips, and projects, we will sharpen the technical skills, powers of observation, and critical mindsets essential to thinking through film, television, sound art, performance, radio and other contemporary moving image and time-based mediums.  The goal of this course is to become more enthusiastic and skilled art makers through both making and watching and to answer the question “where do I fit into this wild world of moving images and what do I want to say about it?”

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 190: WORKSHOPS IN SOCIAL PRACTICE: PRISONS, POLICING, & COVID-19
Laurie Jo Reynolds, M/W, 6:30–9:00pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35844 + 35229

This course provides an introduction to social practice, a genre of art that depends on inquiry, dialogue, participation, and action in projects with real people. Artists have used social practice to fill community needs, generate new social dynamics, bring attention to public space, interpret history, influence policy, provoke audiences, produce comedy, celebrate the uselessness of art, and more. Through artists dialogues, class experiments and interventions, we will explore and evaluate the ways that artists intervene in society and create structures of participation. Hands on workshops will allow students to explore their own areas of interest, working individually and in groups to design socially-engaged art projects. Students may explore any topic of their choice, but we will especially focus on local case studies in prison and policing. 

  • No prior experience required. This is a synchronous Zoom video class. 

  • Please contact ljr@uic.edu with questions.

  • To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.
     

ART 190: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIALLY ENGAGED ART
Faheem Majeed, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 37167 + 37166

Introduces the concept of socially engaged art, a practice that blurs the line between art and life, emphasizing participation, dialogue, and action. Includes field visits and dialogue with artists. Students design and realize a public art project. Course Information: 3 hours. Previously listed as AD 190. Field trips required at a nominal fee. No previous art and studio experience is necessary for this class. Field Trips Required: Mess Hall, Dorchester Projects and Rebuild Foundation, Threewalls, Hyde Park Art Center, Experimental Station, and South Side Community Art Center, are all site-specific resources for this course. Students will visit at least two of these sites as part of their analysis and exploration of socially engaged art practices. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 160. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice. Creative Arts course.

 

ART 212: TOPICS IN DRAWING: DRAWING AND NOTHINGNESS
Nate Young, M/W, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM, CRNs: 41875 + 41876  

What kinds of productive and progressive actions can come out of the void of subjectivity?  In this course students will create a body of work that addresses this question, instigated by a deep thinking about ideas around absence.  Conventionally ideas about absence draw relationships to lack.  In this case we will attempt to think about the void as a space of ultimate potential.  Students will be expected to come up with their own ways of interpreting what the space of nothingness is with help from readings including Fred Moten’s Blackness and Nothingness, Jean Paul Sartre’s Being and Nothingness as well as other contemporary and historical art references and examples.

  • For consent by Instructor, please contact Nate Young: njyoung@uic.edu
  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.ONCAM-This ONCAM course will be ran as hybrid course with students attending in person courses with half of class coming on designated days and the others participating in ASYNC/SYNC education. This will rotate to capture all students enrolled in the class. It will also be subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on the instructors syllabi and instructors' discretions.

 

ART 223: TOPICS IN JUSTICE: RACE & ETHNICITY IN FILM AND DIGITAL MEDIA
Raphael Nash, M/W, 3:00–4:15pm, SYNC, CRN: 42825 

From Minstrelsy to Memes, and everything in between. Since the birth of cinema, film and image artifacts have helped form viewers' perception of society, race relations and ethnic notions. As a product of the 19th century, the roots of American Cinema are often sexist, racially intolerant, and stereotype-dependent. We will explore Hollywood's representation of African-American, Latinx, Muslim, and Asian-American groups across several decades. We will also consider the implications these histories have on digital image-making and social media. Most importantly, we will explore the socio-political contexts that support and sustain racial & ethnic misrepresentation. 

  • Requirements: ART 170 or permission of instructor <raphaelsnash@gmail.com>

  • Laptop required

  • Cross-listed with AH 234

 

ART 250: TOPICS IN NEW MEDIA ARTS: INTERMEDIATE (GAME PLAY) 
Instructor TBD, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, SYNC, CRNs 38225 + 38224
Instructor TBD, M/W, 6:30–9:00pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35237 + 35236

This hands-on course offers an exploration of contemporary art works constructed as games. Games represent a rapidly emerging medium, the history of which must be analyzed through the lenses of art history, new media studies, and game studies in order to be fully contextualized. Students will discuss methods by which game authors extend the visual traditions and conceptual ideals of contemporary art into the gaming medium. In this course, students will simultaneously gain the technical skills needed to create their own games and participatory projects as well as explore different game genres including text-based games, first-person shooters, strategy games, simulators, and abstract games of chance. Students will analyze, develop, play, and even hack games in order to gain an understanding of their frameworks and programmatic strategies. The course is intended to incite an active and critical perspective on contemporary game practices in art. 

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. 
  • For consent by Instructor, please contact Sabrina Raaf: sraaf1@uic.edu
  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 261: ANALOG PHOTOGRAPHY
Colleen Keihm, M/W. 3:00–5:40pm, ONCAM, CRNs: 35246 + 35240

Alternative Processes and Studio Lighting is a photographic course that uses analog and digital principles with studio lighting techniques to create cohesive bodies of work from concept to realization. Through analog practices, we will analyze the driving forces of the medium: light and time. The mechanics of the camera and the physicality of the print will be practiced and examined alongside studio lighting principles. The lessons and tools provided will result in greater control of the image, as well as a practical workflow, enabling problem solving towards self-sufficiency.

  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.ONCAM-This ONCAM course will be ran as hybrid course with students attending in person courses with half of class coming on designated days and the others participating in ASYNC/SYNC education. This will rotate to capture all students enrolled in the class. It will also be subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on the instructors syllabi and instructors' discretions.

 

ART 272: TOPICS IN VIDEO: CAMERA BODIES
Kera MacKenzie, M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, ONCAM, CRNs: 35244 + 35243

What are ways in which we can compare a camera to a body? Where are the limits of that comparison? Thinking through these questions, this course explores photographic and moving image works where bodies fill the frame, alongside works where the camera itself acts as, or becomes, a body. We’ll consider sensory cinema, transgressive cinema, body horror, ethnographies, gestural works, performances for cameras, dance film, point-of-view shots and other human and non-human camera movements. We will use our own bodies and senses as points of departure, feeling out different ideas about camera/body relationships.

  • Requirements: ART 170 or permission of instructor  <keramack@gmail.com>

  • Laptop Required. 

  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.ONCAM-This ONCAM course will be ran as hybrid course with students attending in person courses with half of class coming on designated days and the others participating in ASYNC/SYNC education. This will rotate to capture all students enrolled in the class. It will also be subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on the instructors syllabi and instructors' discretions.

 

ART 274: TOPICS IN ANIMATION: BREAKIN’ IT DOWN
Lopez, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, ONCAM, CRNs: 41870 + 41781

This class will introduce students to a variety of animation, motion graphics, and moving image techniques with the intention of exploring structure.  How does one use chapters, scenes, and components to build a narrative, articulate an idea, or say something that a single segment cannot?   We will look at several works in which distinct separation of segments are used to compose a whole while developing our own projects. The class will primarily execute hands-on moving image techniques, digital animation, tactile animation, 3D modeling, basic shooting techniques and printed material with this in mind. Adobe suite required.  Previous animation experience not necessary!

  • Requirements: ART 170 or permission of instructor <deemarblestone@gmail.com>

  • Laptop Required. 

  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.ONCAM-This ONCAM course will be ran as hybrid course with students attending in person courses with half of class coming on designated days and the others participating in ASYNC/SYNC education. This will rotate to capture all students enrolled in the class. It will also be subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on the instructors syllabi and instructors' discretions.

 

ART 280: COLLABORATIVE PRINTMAKING PRINT SHOP
William Estrada, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, SYNC, CRNs: 43139 + 43140

This course will focus on the creation of digital and printed graphic images within a social and political context to amplify the stories and concerns of historically marginalized groups, with specific attention given to Chicago neighborhoods. Using accessible printmaking techniques, students will potentially work with student and community organizations doing grassroots organizing to develop and distribute images that support people movements. We will learn from the work of contemporary artists working in collaboration with people to challenge oppressive systems.

  • No prior experience required.
  • Laptop Required. 

 

ART 330: TOPICS IN PAINTING II
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, ONCAM AEH 4200, CRNs: 35254 + 35253

In-depth focus regarding a specific topic/emphasis under the direction of the instructor; direct experience and related readings investigate innovations and major directions in contemporary painting. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 332. May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours. Prerequisite(s): ART 230; and junior standing or above; or consent of instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 340: TOPICS IN SCULPTURE II
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 8:00–10:40am, ONCAM, AEH 4100, CRNs: 35256 + 35255

Specific topics--designed by the instructor—address current practices and theories in sculpture and installation. The course is an investigation of sculptural practice as a vehicle by which to explore a variety of media. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 342. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 hours. Field trips required at a nominal fee. Prerequisite(s): ART 240; and junior standing or above; or consent of instructor. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 360: TOPICS IN PHOTOGRAPHY PORTRAITURE
Sasha, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35258 + 35257

The complex entanglement of photography with histories of technology, economic and political innovations loom large within the practice of portraiture, particularly as it relates to the "other", specifically black people or those of the african diaspora. As a colonial project, it imposed a singular vision of the african diaspora subjects as specimens for exotic investigation. However, in the hands of photographers from the diaspora, portraiture became an apparatus to portray diverse experiences of cultures and individuals in transition. The result is a form of visual expression that has had profound implications for the construction and reflection of complex possibilities for African Diasporic imaginaries and identities. This course works within this cultural and aesthetic framework and draws on the work of photographers including Deana Lawson, Latoya Ruby-Frazier Nydia Blas, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, Malick Sidibe, Rotimi Fani-Kayode, Seydou Keita, Samuel Fosso, to investigate portraiture as a site for experimenting with the complexities and subtleties of subjectivity. The course approaches subjectivity as rooted in performance for self and for community. This perspective of subjectivity will anchor inquiries and critiques of identification and representation of ideas of culture, race, gender, sexuality, femininity, masculinity and class. 

 

ART 382: TOPICS IN PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES
Dianna Frid (dfrid1@uic.edu), M/W, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNCHRONOUS ONLINE, CRNs: 35274 + 35273

Thank you for being an artist. There is not one single way to be an artist. The professionalization of art is one reality that is useful to understand. While it is not the only path, this course will touch upon standard professional issues. We will discuss and study and learn from artists and curators (our guests) about how they arrived at their respective artistic platforms. We will also discuss methods for making a sustainable art practice achievable from a practical standpoint. We will touch upon several practical fundamentals that include: the artist’s statement; how to talk about and lecture about your work publicly (your midterm); how you might network and also create community; what are your short-term and long-term goals and how you keep them in mind as you encounter challenges (everyone encounters challenges); how do you make time when there is so much competing for your time (you have to be stubborn and disciplined); how do you define your goals? How do you use your organizational skills to find work? What professional digital presence do you have? These are methods that only you can put into practice. And the plan is to start to improve on these methods in this class.

 

ART 400: ADVANCED CRITIQUE
Doug Ischar, M, 3:00-5:40pm, SYNC, CRN: 41874

A sustained critical viewing and discussion of student work in order to consider, measure and reconsider effective strategies in artistic production. Course Information: Field trips required at a nominal fee. Field work required. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

 

ART 402: BFA THESIS
Sabrina Raaf + Iris Bernblum, T/TH, 12:00–2:40pm, ONCAM, CRNs: 35278 + 35277 

Senior Projects and Critique (a.k.a. Thesis) is a production, discussion and critique class for advanced art majors in Moving Image, Photography, New Media, and Studio Art. It has been designed to establish a multidisciplinary, critical dialogue regarding contemporary art / work. This course is the second of two semesters' study, which will encompass the production and presentation of a Thesis-quality body of work in an exhibition and/or catalog publication format. The work that students accomplish during this second semester of Thesis will likely build upon prior work completed within their major area of concentration. Students are expected to work independently, in a rigorous process of research, production, and presentation of completed projects. Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.ONCAM-This ONCAM course will be ran as hybrid course with students attending in person courses with half of class coming on designated days and the others participating in ASYNC/SYNC education. This will rotate to capture all students enrolled in the class. It will also be subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on the instructors syllabi and instructors' discretions.

 

ART 457: EXPANDED CINEMA 
Instructor TBD, T/TH, 3:30–6:15pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35286 + 35285

This advanced studio course examines the artistic opportunities provided by current and emerging media technologies. From video synthesis to virtual reality, artists have historically taken advantage of new imaging apparatuses to expand ways of seeing/hearing/experiencing. Between laptops, game consoles, video streaming services, mobile devices, and customer service kiosks, interactive moving image screens play an unprecedented and ever expanding role in everyday life. Course sessions will combine screenings, lectures, and discussions on expanded cinema practices along with workshops introducing media techniques, such as VR, AR, projection mapping, and body tracking. No prereqs or previous experience required. 

  • No prior experience required. Laptop Required. 
  • For consent by Instructor, please contact Sabrina Raaf: sraaf1@uic.edu

 

ART 470: ADVANCED PROJECTS IN MOVING IMAGE: TIMEFULNESS
Deborah Stratman, W, 3:00–5:40pm, ONCAM, CRNs: 44162 + 44163

The inexorable direction of change, linked to the asymmetry of time, described by Arthur Eddington as the Arrow of Time.

This course is intended for upper-level undergrads and grads who are developing independent / non-assignment based projects for which TIME  is the primary medium.  This can include audio work, film/video work and performance.  We will collectively work on arriving at a new kind of time literacy.  Writings and projects of geologists, philosophers, scientists, poets and artists will guide our conversations. Students must have independent projects they want to develop over the course of the semester about which they will receive at least two robust critiques.  It is expected that students arrive with technical proficiency in the medium they’ll be working in.

  • Requirements: ART 170 and at least one MI topics class, or consent of instructor  <dstrat1@uic.edu>

  • Laptop Required

  • Course Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.ONCAM-This ONCAM course will be ran as hybrid course with students attending in person courses with half of class coming on designated days and the others participating in ASYNC/SYNC education. This will rotate to capture all students enrolled in the class. It will also be subject to the state of the pandemic and structure based on the instructors syllabi and instructors' discretions.

Interdisciplinary Education in the Arts (IDEAS)

IDEA 120: DIGITAL PRACTICES IN THE ARTS
Tiffany Funk, T/TH, ASYNC, CRNs: 41677 + 41676 

This digital practices course brings together art, design, media, culture and technology studies in a hands-on, collaborative class. In order to understand and explore the new landscapes of technology used by several different disciplines, we infuse this class with making, writing, digital skills building and an introduction to a range of practices that will be useful for creative and critical thinkers because the lines between artists, designers, scholars, and inventors have largely dissolved. This class is required for BA in IDEAS, BA in Theatre and Performance, and BA in Theatre Design, Production and Technology. Extensive computer use required.

 

IDEA 310: INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE FOR IDEA MAJORS
Jason Pickleman​, M/W, 3:00–5:40pm, SYNC, CRN: 44424

During Spring 2021, this course number will hold the content for DES322. This course provides introduction to human-centered design and design-thinking methodologies. Students combine research methodologies (primary and secondary) as it informs and inspires the creation of useful and desirable solutions to design problems. Topic varies by instructor. Prerequisite(s): IDEA 110 and IDEA 120 can be waived for IDEAS majors. Recommended Background: Comfort with interdisciplinary creative practices.

 

IDEA 410: INTERDISCIPLINARY CAPSTONE FOR IDEA MAJORS
Hannah Higgins, TH, 12:00–2:40pm, SYNC, CRN: 44425

A sustained practicum in the production, discussion and theorization of work produced by seniors (in the last two semesters) of IDEA coursework. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Field work required.

Art Education

ART 110: INTRODUCTION TO ART EDUCATION

Introduction to Art Education will introduce students to a range of practical and theoretical perspectives in art education through exploration of various practices and sites in Chicago, the U.S., and in global contexts. Course readings and assignments will be grounded in current debates and diverse examples of the ways in which art education engages context and builds community. We will ask how contemporary practices of art education challenge dominant narratives, foster personal and cultural connections, and create movements for social change. We will consider the complexities of working in collaboration and solidarity with people to address shared issues and concerns. We will become a community of learners in which each student will develop the knowledge, perspectives, and skills to understand and examine the role of the arts and education in democratic life.Course Information: Field trips required at a nominal fee. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory.

 

ART 201: DEMOCRATIC PRACTICES IN ART EDUCATION

The purpose of this course is to prepare you to be an interesting, knowledgeable, inspired and inspiring artist/citizen/educator in the 21st century. Designed as an introduction to practical and theoretical perspectives in art education, this course explores the evolution of various practices and sites of art education in Chicago, the U.S. and in global contexts. The course will offer examples of how art education engages context and community; current forms, practices, and perspectives; personal and cultural connections; and critical social issues. We will consider ways in which art education for social justice involves working in collaboration and solidarity with people to address shared issues and concerns. We will become a community of learners in which each student will develop the knowledge, perspectives, and skills that will help you understand and examine the role of the arts and education in democratic life.

 

ART 210: UNDERSTANDING CURRICULUM, DEVELOPMENT, & LEARNING IN ART EDUCATION
William Estradam, T/TH, 11:00am–1:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 41866 + 41867

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to be knowledgeable, critical, and reflective practitioners of art education. This course contextualizes methods of teaching art within histories of art and education, and provides an introduction to key concepts and conceptual frameworks, including curriculum and critical pedagogy; context and community; teaching diverse learners; trauma informed teaching; and formative assessment. Students will design and teach a curriculum that emphasizes big ideas, critical thinking, contemporary art, cultural diversity, adolescent development, and community issues.

  • Course Information: Field work required. Prerequisite(s): ART 201. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Laboratory-Discussion.

 

ART 310: VISUAL AND VERBAL LITERACY IN ART EDUCATION

The purpose of this course is to prepare teacher candidates in the BFA in Art Education program to be knowledgeable, critical, and reflective practitioners of art education in the 21st C. Throughout the semester, we will explore methods of teaching art in relation to the theory and practice of visual and critical literacy. 

 

ART 410: ART EDUCATION PRACTICUM

The purpose of this course is to provide teacher candidates with opportunities to analyze, teach and prepare plans for curriculum that are culturally responsive. The course will offer examples of how to engage social justice art making through personal and cultural connections that critically examine the role of art education. We will collaborate to build and sustain supportive learning environments that center solidarity with people and address shared issues and concerns. We will become a community of learners in which each student will develop the knowledge, perspectives, and skills that will help them become critical art educators as they prepare for student teaching.

 

ART 484/485: EDUCATIONAL PRACTICUM WITH SEMINAR
Karyn Sandlos, T, 6:30–9:00pm ONCAM AEH 5202, CRNs: 42822 + 42821, 42824 + 42823

The Educational Practicum course continues learning experiences begun during Fieldwork placements in the fall semester. In this course, student teachers (teacher candidates) gain substantive experience teaching contemporary art and visual culture in secondary school settings in Chicago-area schools. Student teachers will work with a mentor teacher to complete a 15-week high school placement. Students will also attend a weekly seminar at UIC. Course Information: Graduate credit only with approval of the School of Art and Art History. Field work required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in ART 210 and Grade of B or better in ART 310 and Grade of B or better in ART 410; and senior standing or above; and approval of the department and approval of the Council for Teacher Education. Class Schedule Information: To be properly registered, students must enroll in one Lecture-Discussion and one Practice.

Art: Graduate Level

ART 480: TOPICS IN JUSTICE: RACE & ETHNICITY IN FILM AND DIGITAL MEDIA
Raphael Nash, M/W, 3:00–4:15pm, SYNC, CRNs: 35290 + 35289

From Minstrelsy to Memes, and everything in between. Since the birth of cinema, film and image artifacts have helped form viewers' perception of society, race relations and ethnic notions. As a product of the 19th century, the roots of American Cinema are often sexist, racially intolerant, and stereotype-dependent. We will explore Hollywood's representation of African-American, Latinx, Muslim, and Asian-American groups across several decades. We will also consider the implications these histories have on digital image-making and social media. Most importantly, we will explore the socio-political contexts that support and sustain racial & ethnic misrepresentation. 

  • Requirements: ART 170 or permission of instructor <raphaelsnash@gmail.com>

  • Laptop required

  • Cross-listed with AH 234

 

ART 520: SEMINAR IN CONTEMPORARY THEORY
Shawne Holloway, T, 3:30–6:15pm, TBD, CRNs: 36250 + 36249 
Marie Brown, F, 1:00–3:40pm, SYNC, CRNs: 36252 + 36251 

Developments and current issues in contemporary design, studio and media arts: major philosophies, debates, and social/environmental aspects (may include visiting lecturers, critics, and discussants). Course Information: Previously listed as AD 502. Must be repeated for a minimum of 16 hours. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of the School, graduate faculty committee, and the student's advisor. Class Schedule Information: To be registered properly, students must enroll in one Lecture and one Discussion.

 

ART 530: ADVANCED GRADUATE CRITIQUE
Deborah Stratman, Doug Ischar + Dan Peterman, Arranged, SYNC, CRNs: 35599 + 35598

Individualized graduate study; creative projects and research by each student through consultive agreement with graduate faculty committee. Course Information: Previously listed as AD 530. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and approval of the School graduate faculty committee. Class Schedule Information: To be registered properly, students must enroll in one Laboratory and one Conference.

 

ART 540: DECARCERATION IN THEORY AND PRACTICE UNDER COVID-19
Laurie Jo Reynolds, W, 6:30–9:00pm, SYNC, CRNs: 44164 + 44568

The growing political will to end mass incarceration has led to federal and state commitments to “decarcerate.” Yet, there is no policy roadmap for releasing people or closing prisons. Decarceration requires a mathematical strategy: judges, prosecutors, law enforcement, and legislators must either reverse drivers of the prison population or speed up releases. Truly sustainable decarceration would also protect people in poor and disenfranchised communities from both crime and incarceration, and address the nearly insurmountable barriers faced by people returning from prison. What can be achieved depends on the interplay of political forces, media attention, advocacy campaigns, and the way criminal justice topics are framed in the public sphere by policy operatives and cultural activists. This course examines all of those through case studies in decarceration under COVID-19, particularly 2017 Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority Task Force to reform sex offense laws, and renewed efforts to create discretionary parole for people with life and virtual life sentences. We also consider what it would take, and what it might be like, to shift to another paradigm of crime prevention and accountability. This is a professional practice course. Students will participate in public policy advocacy. (This is a synchronous Zoom video class. Please contact ljr@uic.edu with questions.)

  • Course Information: Cross Listed with CLJ 542. Field trips required at a nominal fee. No previous art experience is necessary for this class.
Art History

Visit the Art History website for avilable courses: https://arthistory.uic.edu/courses/current-course-flyers/

Museum & Exhibition Studies

View available MUSE courses here: https://artandarthistory.uic.edu/muse/courses